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Full speed ahead

Barely out of the airplane and most certainly not yet over their jet lag the summer architecture and design students started working. Lectures and the first assignment packed into a compressed week. And then earlier this week students presented their work to each other.

The first assignment in the summer prepares students for their study tour. It does this in various ways. Sites students go to are investigated and analyzed using Danish architecture historian Erik Nygaards model from his phenomenal book, Arkitektur forstået (Architecture understood, but the book unfortunately is not available in English). The analysis is presented in a slideshow to fellow students in the study tour groups. Architecture, interior architecture and urban design students make physical models of buildings and sites. Graphic design students make infographics. And furniture students make mood boards.

The physical models have been done for years. Erik Nygaards analytical model we have used the past two years, and improved on it on the way. But it was the first time we tried out the infographic element for the graphic students and also the first time we had furniture students make mood boards. Looking at the results I think we can be pleased with the new assignments, but in particular pleased with the way students engaged in these new assignments. Awesome, guys!

You can see the two assignment formats below. Enjoy also the pictures of the students with their work.

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Ready, set, go!

In less than a week the larger part of the Architecture & Design students for summer 2015 will arrive. These past weeks we have run one course only, Design and Society, a three week summer course run by Courtney Coyne Jensen. Next week 150 students will begin to populate our studios – architecture, architecture foundations, interior architecture, graphic design, graphic design foundation, urban design and furniture design.

Summer 2015 faculty meeting up for a sharing session and a glass of wine at the furniture wood workshop at Holmbladsgade, where the 50 furniture students will spend a lot of time.

Summer 2015 faculty meeting up for a sharing session and a glass of wine at the furniture wood workshop at Holmbladsgade, where the 50 furniture students will spend a lot of time.

I hope you students, right now packing and planning your summer, are as excited as we are. We are ready. The weather is ready. Copenhagen is ready. For you.

See you very soon.

The final three

The final three sessions of the spring 2015 semester of the longest running formalized DIS Architecture and Design lecture course – today called 20th and 21st Century Danish Architecture – came to a conclusion today. Three field studies to three different works of architecture, that taken together illustrate both the depth and the scope of the past two centuries of Danish architecture, concluded the course.

The three final works we visited were:

  • Thorvaldsens Museum by MG Bindesbøll, (1839-1848)
  • The National Bank of Denmark, by Arne Jacobsen (1965-1978)
  • Kilen at the Copenhagen Business School, by Lundgaard and Tranberg (2002-2005)
Visiting Thorvaldens Museum.

Visiting Thorvaldens Museum.

Tbhorvaldens Museum - a so-called Gesamtkunstwerk - where architecture, sculpture, painting, and interiors form a spectacular whole.

Thorvaldsens Museum – a so-called Gesamtkunstwerk – where architecture, sculpture, painting, and interiors form a spectacular whole.

Museum and tomb - Thorvaldsens grave in the central courtyard.

Museum and tomb – Thorvaldsens grave in the central courtyard.

Outside the National Bank.

Outside the National Bank.

The lobby - Photo courtesy of The National Bank (Photography inside not permitted).

The lobby – Photo courtesy of The National Bank (Photography inside not permitted).

The lobby - Photo courtesy of The National Bank (Photography inside not permitted).

The lobby – Photo courtesy of The National Bank (Photography inside not permitted).

Outside Kilen, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects, 2002-2005.

Outside Kilen, by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects, 2002-2005.

Inside Kilen.

Inside Kilen.

Inside Kilen.

Inside Kilen.

Inside Kilen.

Inside Kilen.

And outside Kilen again - toasting to an awesome class who helped me through this first season of running 20th and 21st Century Danish Architecture.

And outside Kilen again – toasting to an awesome class who helped me through this first season of running 20th and 21st Century Danish Architecture.

I only took over the course at the beginning of this semester. After a resignation from a faculty, ten days before the semester, and a sold out course with 30 anxious students, I felt an obligation to save the course. I also wanted to introduce some changes and in this situation got to deal with that myself. Students over the past semesters had asked for more contemporary architecture, better field studies, more engaging assignments, and more dialogue. Students of the spring 2015 semester will be the judges of wether I succeeded in making this come true. I am happy that I survived the semester, teaching two 3- credit lecture courses along with keeping busy being the program director. I can only thank some absolutely amazing students, in both my courses, for making this possible.You have all been ace.

Spring 2015 comes to an end

Two days of presentations. Four months of hard work. A decision for life to study abroad – the DIS Architecture and Design students had a lot to celebrate when the spring 2015 semester came to a conclusion. The courtyard in Skindergade was the venue – what better place to reflect on a semester in Copenhagen – next to The Round Tower and in a courtyard that has housed academics ever since Copenhagen University took over the site in 1536.

The spring students have only been here since the end of January – the 29 full year students who could celebrate the conclusion of a full year abroad came to Copenhagen in August of 2014. The have taken lecture courses, been on field studies and study trips, and designing exciting and challenging projects in studio.

It has been an amazing semester – starting with the snow and darkness of late January, slowly moving toward the light in April and May, and now ending with sunshine, cherry trees in full bloom and the birch trees opening their green leaves. Our students have been extraordinary – dedicated, energetic and curious to constantly learn new things and take in the stay in Copenhagen in full. Thanks you for being such amazing students. Thank you to the faculty who once again have worked hard and created spectacular studios full of energy and engagement. And thanks to my wonderful and hard working staff in the AD office. I have so much enjoyed the spring 2015 semester.

Each semester we recognize one outstanding student in each discipline (architecture, urban design, and graphic design) with an Award of Academic Excellence.  The awards are given to students who have distinguished themselves through diligence, commitment, academic performance, and ideally a student who contributes to a positive, collaborative learning environment in class.

The four Award of Academic Excellence recipients of Spring 2015 semester are:

In Architecture: Zachary Williams from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Ibispo

In Interior Architecture: Tathya Abe from Brown University

In Urban Design: Kathleen Hanley from Harvard University

In Graphic Design: Symone Fogg from Georgetown University

Academic Excellence Award recipient Zachary Williams, CalPoly, SLO, together with DIS Faculty Bo Christiansen.

Architecture Academic Excellence Award recipient Zachary Williams, CalPoly, SLO, together with DIS Faculty Bo Christiansen.

Academic Excellence Award recipient Tathya Abe, Brown University, together with DIS Faculty Eva Frederiksen.

Interior Architecture Academic Excellence Award recipient Tathya Abe, Brown University, together with DIS Faculty Eva Frederiksen.

Academic Excellence Award recipient Kathleen Hanley, Harvard University, together with DIS Faculty Rasmus Frisk.

Urban Design Academic Excellence Award recipient Kathleen Hanley, Harvard University, together with DIS Faculty Rasmus Frisk.

Academic Excellence Award recipient Symone Fogg, Georgetown University, together with DIS Faculty Martin Dahlbeck.

Graphic Design Academic Excellence Award recipient Symone Fogg, Georgetown University, together with DIS Faculty Martin Dahlbeck.

Below some images from the final student social.

Arne Jacobsen, famous Danish modernist architect, of course was at the social.

Arne Jacobsen, famous Danish modernist architect, of course was at the social….

...inspiring students to come up with their own designs for architects glasses.

…inspiring students to come up with their own designs for architects glasses.

..and more designs ...

..and more designs …

...and ice cream galore ...

…and ice cream galore …

...for faculty as well - Eva Frederiksen caught hiding behind a cone!

…for faculty as well – Eva Frederiksen caught hiding behind a cone!

Time to catch up with fellow DIS AD faculty - Bo Christiansen, Mikael Fuhr, Søren Amsnæs and Courtney Coyne Jensen.

Time to catch up with fellow DIS AD faculty – Bo Christiansen, Mikael Fuhr, Søren Amsnæs and Courtney Coyne Jensen.

..Marie-Louise Holst in conversation with fellow DIS AD faculty, Rasmus Frisk.

..Marie-Louise Holst in conversation with fellow DIS AD faculty, Rasmus Frisk.

..and more designer eyewear...

..and more designer eyewear…

...and more ice cream...

…and more ice cream…

Lucas Baran and Gus Griffin giving the AD program a helping hand setting up - and socializing with AD Assistant Program Director, Anna Yust.

Lucas Baran and Gus Griffin giving the AD program a helping hand setting up – and socializing with AD Assistant Program Director, Anna Yust.

'Jacobisms' a new term entered the vocabulary - in honor of DIS AD Faculty Jacob Nørløv from his studio of dedicated and humorous students.

‘Jacobisms’ a new term entered the vocabulary – in honor of DIS AD Faculty Jacob Nørløv from his studio of dedicated and humorous students.

...more Jacobisms...

…more Jacobisms…

...showcasing famous sayings of DIS faculty quickly caught on...

…showcasing famous sayings of DIS faculty quickly caught on…

Hi Mom!

Hi Mom!

Yo Martin!

Yo Martin!

Dalton caught (almost) unaware!

Dalton caught (almost) unaware!

Bo Christiansen adressing the students.

Bo Christiansen adressing the students.

Great afternoon in the courtyard. Great final to the spring 2015 semester.

Great afternoon in the courtyard. Great final to the spring 2015 semester.

Urban design for all seasons

Spring was far away when I took my Spring 2015 European Urban Design Theory students on the first of five field studies back in February. There was snow, it was freezing cold, and we always went out early, first class of the day. I warn students ahead of time – this class is not for you if you find it hard to get out of bed in the morning!

But my students did get out of bed – and we went to places – Sluseholmen, Islands Brygge, Superkilen, SEB, vesterbro – all places that at the beginning of semester were only, if at all, names on a map to my students. Now, I think they all have a grasp of the city – that is at least what their participation and engagement in class has proven to me.

I have always liked to teach this course, liked the fact that it attracts both architecture and design students as well as a host of other exciting students form all corners of the academic field. Liked the discussion this wonderful mix of backgrounds can give to a class about cities and urban design – students from small places and from big cities, students with US background and students with international background, students from architecture, sustainability, sociology, the humanities, etc.

I will miss this class tremendously.

Miss, because I have been forced to chose to continue with only one of the two courses I have taught this semester. Beginning of the year a faculty resigned and left me with a fully sold out 20th and 21st Century Danish Architecture course with no faculty. I decided to take on the challenge of not only teaching this course, but also to introduce some of the changes I felt this particular course was in need of.

But being a program director leaves you with only so much time to teach – and essentially I can only teach one course a semester, thus I had to chose. It is with a bleeding heart that I will let go of urban design and hire a new faculty to teach this. But I am sure new hands and new eyes will also bring something to the course that future students will be happy about. And we will of course try to keep the good things students have helped me develop over the years.

Below the many wonderful students I have had the pleasure to work with in this course.

Thanks to each and everyone of you students who helped make this course so pleasurable to teach.

Spring 2015 - freezing cold at Sluseholmen. You remember guys?

Spring 2015 – freezing cold at Sluseholmen. You remember guys?

Fall 2014 students at Sluseholmen in weather a little more agreeable.

Fall 2014 students at Sluseholmen in weather a little more agreeable.

Spring 2014 at Superkilen - trying to understand this crazy place.

Spring 2014 at Superkilen – trying to understand this crazy place.

Fall 2013 at Kalvebod Wave - just opened earlier that year.

Fall 2013 at Kalvebod Wave – just opened earlier that year.

Spring 2013 students visiting Nørrebroparken and the Urban Gardening project, 2200N.

Spring 2013 students visiting Nørrebroparken and the Urban Gardening project, 2200N.

Fall 2012 students at Islands Brygge and the hostile ground floor of The Gemini Building.

Fall 2012 students at Islands Brygge and the hostile ground floor of The Gemini Building.

Spring 2012 students at SEB

Spring 2012 students at SEB

Fall 2011 students - my first class after taking over this course. We visited Torvehallerne on the day it opened. What an urban coincidence to have class at a time and date of such an important occassion.

Fall 2011 students – my first class after taking over this course. We visited Torvehallerne on the day it opened. What an urban coincidence to have class at a time and date of such an important occassion.

All over the place

Travel and airports, i.e. waiting in airports – themes of the two trips I made this spring to visit US partner universities. The other theme: fantastic partners in the US. I visited 8 different institutions during my two weeks of travel, in March and in April. Only bad weather prevented me from visiting another two institutions. All over I met study abroad staff, faculty and students who all are extremely interested in and supportive of DIS. What a joy.

The places and people I got to meet this time were:

March:

  • Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
    • Susan Pratt, Luca Lipparini, Joseph Nadeau, and Annabel Wharton
  • University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas
    • Peter McKeith, Brian Poepsel, Ashley Whiting, Phoebe Lickwar, and a lecture crowd for my evening talk on Danish architecture
  • University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas
    • David Wiley, Stephen Grabow, AJ Prizzi, JJ Pechauer, Chloe Lockman, Brittany Hodges, and Riley Uecker
  • Colorado State College, Fort Collins, Denver
    • Katharine Leigh, Laura Thornes, Robert Brooker, Laura Malinen, and a full class room in the interior design program for an info session on DIS

April:

  • Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana
    • Ken Schwartz, Pete Alongia, Jill Stoll, Joshua Burns, and Ghazi Lashab
  • Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), Baltimore
    • Mary Lynn Allen, Cassandra Krumbholz, Frank Fantauzzi, Katie O’Meara, Christina Cheng, and a room full of architecture students for an info session on DIS
  • Colgate College, Hamilton, New York
    • DeWitt Godfrey, Carolyn Guile, Liz Marlowe, and Carol Drogus
  • Parsons New School, New York, New York
    • Alexis Kraft, Brian McGrath, Lucille Tenazas, YuJune Park, Meredith Mullane, Jill Corson Lake, and a room full of architecture students for an info session on DIS.
A professor in his den - Stephen Grabow, University of Kansas

A professor in his den – Stephen Grabow, University of Kansas

With Chloe, Brittany and AJ, University of Kansas.

With DIS Alumni Chloe, Brittany and AJ, University of Kansas.

With DIS Alumni JJ and xxx, University of Kansas.

With DIS Alumni JJ and Riley, University of Kansas.

With DIS Alumni Christina Chen, MICA, Baltimore.

With DIS Alumni Christina Cheng, MICA, Baltimore.

Duke University, Durham, North Carolina - and this is the Biddle Music Building by Edward Durell Stone from 1974.

Duke University, Durham, North Carolina – and this is the Biddle Music Building by Edward Durell Stone from 1974.

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas - this is the new architecture building by Marlon Blackwell Architect, 2013

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas – this is the new architecture building by Marlon Blackwell Architect, 2013

University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas

University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.

Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.

Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana - the Mardi Grass Tree on campus.

Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana – the Mardi Grass Tree on campus.

MICA, Baltimore, Maryland - Brown Center by Ziger/Snead and Charles Brickbauer, 2004.

MICA, Baltimore, Maryland – Brown Center by Ziger/Snead and Charles Brickbauer, 2004.

Colgate College, Hamilton, New York - the Dana Arts Center, by Paul Rudolph, 1966

Colgate College, Hamilton, New York – the Dana Arts Center, by Paul Rudolph, 1966

Parsons, The New School, New York, New York - University Center by SOM, 2013.

Parsons, The New School, New York, New York – University Center by SOM, 2013.

The necessary art of visual notetaking

At the heart of visual notetaking lies the skill of observing, analyzing and communicating our physical environments and objects that surround us. Designers and architects have done this for centuries – collections of sketchbooks by famous architects are stored in museums around the world. But before they ended there, they would have been lying on tables or been carried around in pockets and consulted on a daily basis. Because this is what a sketchbook is and must be: something in which to store your experiences, make sense of them through annotations, reflections and diagramming, and a source of inspiration to be consulted throughout the design process. A sketchbook is and should be an active tool, not a passive storage unit.

Faculty Bo Frederiksen had brought examples of his own sketchbooks to share with the students.

Faculty Bo Frederiksen had brought examples of his own sketchbooks to share with the students.

The architecture and design students at DIS are introduced to four different ways of visual notetaking during the first day of core course week – a full week devoted to students core courses ending with the first study tour, the short study tour to Western Denmark. This was the second time we ran the visual notetaking as a fair, a Round Robin, where students during the course of a day get to spend an hour with each of the four journal types: visual, urban, watercolor, and graphic.

In the fall we tried the Visual Notetaking Fair for the first time – read about the premiere here.

In the spring we improved the fair based on student input, that primarily had asked us to give a little more time for each of the introductions and to make sure concrete exercises were included.

Students sketching at Bispetorv.

Students sketching at Bispetorv.

The four faculty took this on them and created fantastic intros spiced with concrete exercises both in the class room and outside in the urban environment. The visual journal was run by Bo Wermuth Frederiksen, the urban design journal by Rasmus Frisk, the watercolor by Søren Amsnæs, and the graphic design by Gunhild Bønlykke Pedersen.

The fantastic four from left to right: Bo Frederiksen, Gunhild Bønlykke, Rasmus Frisk and Søren Amsnæs.

The fantastic four faculty from left to right: Bo Frederiksen, Gunhild Bønlykke Pedersen, Rasmus Frisk and Søren Amsnæs.

Below you can see some impressions from the day. The second day of the core course week is devoted to the studio and assignment 2, that students have just started on. And then from Thursday to Saturday the three-day study tour to Western Denmark. Check out the Core Course Booklet also.

Getting feedback from faculty.

Getting feedback from faculty.

Watercolor brushes ready for students to try out.

Watercolor brushes ready for students to try out.

In class sessions ...

In class sessions …

...and outdoor exersizes.

…and outdoor exercises.

Students were exposed to many different ways of visual notetaking throughout the day.

Students were exposed to many different ways of visual notetaking throughout the day.

From Bindesbøll to BIG

The oldest formal course in the Architecture and Design Program at DIS is the architecture history course Danish Architecture and Planning – now called 20th and 21st Century Danish Architecture. It has been part of the curriculum at DIS since the early 1960’s. The course offers students an insight into some of the masterworks of Danish architecture – past and present. The course also aims to position Danish architecture in the larger Scandinavian and European architecture scene. And finally, the course aims to make the connection between architecture and design and the wider cultural and social and political context of Denmark as it has developed over the past two centuries.

I am now teaching this course and today I had the pleasure of showing my 30 students some true Danish masterworks – spanning the whole period we take an interest in, we went from Brumleby, designed by MG Bindesbøll (1853), via Bagsværd Church, designed by Jørn Utzon (1974-76) to end up at Bjerget, The Mountain, designed by PLOT/BIG (2007-08). The full scope of the course in a half a day was the ambition.

All three cases form an essential part of Danish architecture history. All three can teach us a thing or two – still.

Brumleby, for example, even when seen on a snowy and cold morning like today, is a showcase of simplicity in planning and layout, and yet offers a host of opportunities for community building as well as individualization – just look at the way in which residents claim the sidewalk in front of their house for pots, plants, chairs and art.

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Among the Brumleby buildings by MG Bindesbøll, on Østerbro in Copenhagen.

 

The simple plan layout of Brumleby - a solid and robust plan that has held all the way through until today even, creating a great and friendly community.

The simple plan layout of Brumleby – a solid and robust plan that has held all the way through until today even, creating a great and friendly community.

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Individual use and communal spaces mix well in Brumleby.

Individual use and communal spaces mix well in Brumleby.

Brumleby on a spring day.

Brumleby on a spring day.

Even if it is just a narrow sidewalk, it can be inhabited and made personal.

Even if it is just a narrow sidewalk, it can be inhabited and made personal.

What better way to dry your laundry?

What better way to dry your laundry?

Bagsværd, for example, and the way in which formal construction systems, additive design theories, and modern building materials still manage to create an absolutely wonderful and poetic church.

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In front of Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon, in Bagsværd north of Copenhagen.

A simple plan, a rectangle, with a corridor on either side, and spaces across in between.

A simple plan, a rectangle, with a corridor on either side, and spaces across in between. The section of course a spectacle out of this world.

The curved ceiling of the church room - the organic light instrument sitting inside the mechanic, almost factory like outer shell.

The curved ceiling of the church room – the organic light instrument sitting inside the mechanic, almost factory like outer shell.

The inspiration and the sketches - people walking toward the horizon under the skies of the heaven. Simple yet poetic.

The inspiration and the sketches – people walking toward the horizon under the skies of the heaven. Simple yet poetic.

Taking stock of the transition from the low vaulted entrance toward the high vaulted space at the altar - a transition in light and space.

Taking stock of the transition from the low vaulted entrance toward the high vaulted space at the altar – a transition in light and space.

Bjerget, The Mountain, for example, and the way in which creativity let loose can shape new ways of living, new ways of combining the banal and the poetic – the parking garage with the slanted row houses on top – who’d have thought of that if not – Bjarke Ingels.

In front of Bjerget, The Mountain, by PLOT/BIG - in Ørestad.

In front of Bjerget, The Mountain, by PLOT/BIG – in Ørestad.

The Mountain from the side of the metro.

The Mountain from the side of the metro.

The Mountain from the side of the residential units.

The Mountain from the side of the residential units.

The Mountain - and the VM Houses, from the air.

The Mountain – and the VM Houses, from the air.

The structure as real estate property

The structure as real estate property

Layout of one of the typologies.

Layout of one of the typologies.

The all new DIS summer furniture course presented

After 16 years of incremental evolution the summer Furniture Design in Scandinavia Studio and Workshop has been improved substantially for the coming summer. We will be hosting the workshop, for the very first time, in the new DIS workshop facilities at Holmbladsgade. This building DIS acquired a year ago and transformed to student housing. On the ground floor, the Architecture and Design Program got a space that we have equipped as a fully functioning wood workshop. Our own wood workshop. This marks a transition point in the history of furniture studio and workshop courses at DIS.

Holmbladsgade 70B is home to the all new DIS wood workshop.

Holmbladsgade 70B is home to the all new DIS wood workshop.

The building, Holmbladsgade 70B, as it looks today - now home to 64 DIS students and the AD Wood Workshop.

The building, Holmbladsgade 70B, as it looks today – now home to 64 DIS students and the AD Wood Workshop.

The new workshop made us think about how to further improve and maybe revolutionize the summer Furniture Design in Scandinavia Studio and Workshop. We set up the following priorities:

  • We wanted to put the individual student’s design development at the heart of the course

  • We wanted to further strengthen the Scandinavian foundation of the course

  • We wanted to embrace both traditional and more contemporary approaches to furniture design

  • We wanted to strengthen the lecture component to better service the individual student’s design development

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Sketching, drawing, discussing design – summer furniture is hard work but also a fantastic experience.

 

Over the past 6 months my team of furniture faculty have played a key part in developing a strong, new version of the summer Furniture Design in Scandinavia Studio and Workshop that I am proud to be able to share with you now.

The new facilities have given us a lot of fantastic opportunities, that have informed the development of the new and improved syllabus. It has also meant, that some limitations have been enforced.

The scale of the woodshop has meant, that we will have a cap of 50 students in the summer Furniture Design in Scandinavia Studio and Workshop. This is only a handful lower than the average enrollment has been over the past 10 years, but it will of course mean, that we may have to turn qualified students away, if the cap is reached.

Moving forward these are the highlights of the new syllabus:

  • We will be working primarily in wood but with potential supplements in other materials – this means we will give up on the somewhat rigid ‘three-materials’ regime of making chairs in either solely wood, veneer or metal.
  • We will put the individual student’s design development and ambitions at the heart of the course – this means students will no longer be put in one of the ‘three-materials’ sections, but be free to develop their own design within the general scale and volume limitations based on what we can handle in the workshop.
  • We will support the individual student’s design development with a much more structured and rigorous lecture section that will contain both lectures on Scandinavian furniture design history and lectures on design development, storytelling, materials, scale and drawing.
  • We will further support the individual student’s design development with much more faculty directed studio time and with a series of structured design reviews to help push the the individual student’s design as far as possible before going into the workshop.
  • In the workshop we will aim to create a much stronger and community based experience where both design leads and workshop assistants will be available throughout the production proces leading to the final piece of furniture that continues to be the goal we will arrive at.
  • We have also sharpened the evaluation of students and the grading components to make them much more part of the individual students design development and placing more of them earlier on in the semester, so that faculty can have dialogues with the student about their individual standing while they are still together with the students (this instead of final exams for example, where students cannot truly learn anything and get no instantly usable feedback, since student and the grading faculty are no longer together, as the student has left the country before grades are finalized.)
  • Finally we will further strengthen the week-long faculty led study tour to Sweden and Finland with both a preparatory study tour assignment investigating sites and designs that will be visited and with an optimized framing of the individual tour elements by faculty on the tour.

We are extremely proud to be able to share these improvements with you and hope for your continued support.

End of summer session exhibition

End of summer session exhibition 2014

Personally I am also extremely proud to present a strong team of faculty and workshop assistants that have all committed themselves to the future of this course – they exhibit a fabulous combination of strong design backgrounds, teaching, business and workshop experience and vitality.

Summer 2015 will be lead by:

  • Tina Christensen – design and workshop lead
  • Erling Christoffersen – design and workshop lead
  • Rasmus Fenhann – design and workshop lead
  • Flemming Steen Jensen – workshop assistant
  • Lars Hansen – workshop assistant
  • Anders Engholm Kristensen – workshop assistant

Check the faculty CV’s here.

Find bellow the draft syllabus for Summer 2015.

Spring is here (almost)

They have arrived – the DIS Architecture and Design students of Spring 2015 – even if the spring itself is not quite here. The students, though, are here and already hard at work. A week into the semester and they already could present their first accomplishments: the result of the first assignment, a collaborative case study preparing students for their upcoming long study tour.

We have tweaked and adjusted and refined the so-called study tour assignment over the past year, and now we think we have arrived at the high quality assignment we have been aiming at. You can check it out below.

Preparing for the long study tour through a group assignment has been a classic in the architecture and design program at DIS for many years. What we have added over the past year is a more academically rigorous method and model, the students need to adhere to. Furthermore we have aimed at and finally managed to include the graphic design students in this assignment as well. In the past, graphic design students typically made a page for the tour book as part of their study tour preparation, where the AD students made physical models. A physical model is a typical way for architecture students to carry out a case study. Not so much for graphic design students. What they did this time then was to create a poster – a metaphorical interpretation of the site or design they will visit in a few weeks.

 

Students at the assignment 1 social - looking at all of the models and posters produced in the first intense week in studio.

Students at the assignment 1 social – looking at all of the models and posters produced in the first intense week in studio.

The results – of all AD students – can be seen here.

150130_DIS_SP15_ASN_1_Social_001

All faculty were invited and their courses posted.

Big and small models - all for the benefit of learning about the design and the architecture.

Big and small models – all for the benefit of learning about the design and the architecture.

Meredith Soychak (CU Boulder), Marianna Nowacki (St. Michaels College) and Jennifer Ford (Bradley University) showing their interpretation of the graphic design for Brandts Klædefabrik, Odense.

Meredith Soychak (CU Boulder), Marianna Nowacki (St. Michaels College) and Jennifer Ford (Bradley University) showing their interpretation of the graphic design for Brandts Klædefabrik, Odense.

Julia Melendres (CalPoly, Pomona) and Martin Man (Vassar College) with Peter Zumthors Sumvitg Chapel. Kady Murzin also contributed to this project.

Julia Melendres (CalPoly, Pomona) and Martin Man (Vassar College) with Peter Zumthors Sumvitg Chapel. Kady Murzin also contributed to this project.

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